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Pictures from the book MINE EYES HAVE SEEN;bearing witness to the struggle for civil rights

James Whitmore filming Black Like Me, Tampa, Florida. 1964


“For many people in America, the book and then the film Black Like Me, in which a white journalist traveled the South in blackface, learning what it was like to be black in a segregated land, was a revelation.
Many whites had no idea of the daily indignities and the constant
strain visited by racism. Today blackface is rightly taboo. But Fred
Astaire’s homage to the great Bojangles and Black Like Me — those are
the exceptions to that rule.”
James Whitmore filming Black Like Me, Tampa, Florida. 1964 “For many people in America, the book and then the film Black Like Me, in which a white journalist traveled the South in blackface, learning what it was like to be black in a segregated land, was a revelation. Many whites had no idea of the daily indignities and the constant strain visited by racism. Today blackface is rightly taboo. But Fred Astaire’s homage to the great Bojangles and Black Like Me — those are the exceptions to that rule.”
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Playing “Statue,” a girl makes a face that breaks up her playmate, New York City.  1972
Playing “Statue,” a girl makes a face that breaks up her playmate, New York City. 1972
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Soul on fire: Amiri Baraka, Harlem, New York City. 1966

“Gifted poet, brilliant essayist, startling playwright
Amiri Baraka, who I knew as Leroi Jones in his youth,
has spent his life searching for the answers to the problems of African Americans — a search for systematic
answers to bedeviling questions.  His quest led him
to Black Nationalism and, later, Scientific Socialism.”
Soul on fire: Amiri Baraka, Harlem, New York City. 1966 “Gifted poet, brilliant essayist, startling playwright Amiri Baraka, who I knew as Leroi Jones in his youth, has spent his life searching for the answers to the problems of African Americans — a search for systematic answers to bedeviling questions. His quest led him to Black Nationalism and, later, Scientific Socialism.”
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Master of them that know: writer Ralph Ellison,  Harlem,  New York City.  1968

“Ralph wrote the great American
novel, Invisible Man, and I had the
good fortune to benefit from his
wisdom through many, many hours
of great talk. I never met anyone
more intelligent and insightful,
or with a better sense of humor.
Ralph understood brilliantly how
black and white cultural life intertwined,
and he recognized how
much that interaction enriched
American life. His insights were
so powerful, they transformed my
vision and my photographs. No
one in my adult life influenced my
thinking more.
Master of them that know: writer Ralph Ellison, Harlem, New York City. 1968 “Ralph wrote the great American novel, Invisible Man, and I had the good fortune to benefit from his wisdom through many, many hours of great talk. I never met anyone more intelligent and insightful, or with a better sense of humor. Ralph understood brilliantly how black and white cultural life intertwined, and he recognized how much that interaction enriched American life. His insights were so powerful, they transformed my vision and my photographs. No one in my adult life influenced my thinking more."-Bob Adelman
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James Baldwin having a drink with his brother at a Broadway bar,  New York City.  1965

“Many who saw Jimmy on television remember him as a scold. But if you knew him, he was the most tender, affectionate friend.  He warned America that we were on the brink of racial chaos and we must find our way back to each other — hopefully through love. He could preach. And could he ever write. In a not-totally-sober moment, he confided that he became a writer because he thought he was ugly: The only way he could communicate with people was if they didn’t see him. Paradoxically, he became one of the most visible writers in the world, and nobody appreciated the irony of that more than Jimmy.”
James Baldwin having a drink with his brother at a Broadway bar, New York City. 1965 “Many who saw Jimmy on television remember him as a scold. But if you knew him, he was the most tender, affectionate friend. He warned America that we were on the brink of racial chaos and we must find our way back to each other — hopefully through love. He could preach. And could he ever write. In a not-totally-sober moment, he confided that he became a writer because he thought he was ugly: The only way he could communicate with people was if they didn’t see him. Paradoxically, he became one of the most visible writers in the world, and nobody appreciated the irony of that more than Jimmy.”
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James Baldwin mourns at a memorial service for the four girls killed in Birmingham in the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing. New York City, 1963.
James Baldwin mourns at a memorial service for the four girls killed in Birmingham in the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing. New York City, 1963.
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The Slugger: baseball great Hank Aaron at the All-Star Game, Kansas City, Missouri.  1975
The Slugger: baseball great Hank Aaron at the All-Star Game, Kansas City, Missouri. 1975
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The Champ: heavyweight boxing champion George Foreman, New York City.  1995


“During a break, Foreman told me that he was saved by a ‘benevolent society.’ He had been
doing poorly in school and was getting into trouble. Fearing police were looking for him,
he hid under his family’s home and covered himself in sand, breathing through a straw.
There had to be a better way. His salvation was a government-sponsored anti-poverty
boxing program, the Job Corps, that led to his Olympic gold medal and eventually the World Championship.
The Champ: heavyweight boxing champion George Foreman, New York City. 1995 “During a break, Foreman told me that he was saved by a ‘benevolent society.’ He had been doing poorly in school and was getting into trouble. Fearing police were looking for him, he hid under his family’s home and covered himself in sand, breathing through a straw. There had to be a better way. His salvation was a government-sponsored anti-poverty boxing program, the Job Corps, that led to his Olympic gold medal and eventually the World Championship.
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Boys to men,  Easter Sunday,  Harlem,  New York City. 1982
Boys to men, Easter Sunday, Harlem, New York City. 1982
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Corridors of power: Lionel M. Stevens joins a growing cadre of savvy young black executives at a Wall Street firm in the wake of the Civil Rights Movement,
New York City.  1966
Corridors of power: Lionel M. Stevens joins a growing cadre of savvy young black executives at a Wall Street firm in the wake of the Civil Rights Movement, New York City. 1966
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Styling: A barber conks, or chemically straightens, his client’s hair, New York City.  1962
Styling: A barber conks, or chemically straightens, his client’s hair, New York City. 1962
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Fly, at Kennedy Airport, New York City.  1970
Fly, at Kennedy Airport, New York City. 1970
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Celeb: Fans pose for a photo with Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher Dock Ellis before a game at Three Rivers Stadium,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  1975
Celeb: Fans pose for a photo with Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher Dock Ellis before a game at Three Rivers Stadium, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 1975
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“Silky,” a pimp, with his “stars,” New York City.  1970


“Why would a pimp who leeches off women end up as a popular culture hero? The illusion persists that there is
some effortless way to make it to Easy Street. And in a world of one-parent families, a man who is getting it
over on women may appear enviable. Outlaws can look like heroes to the young and rebellious. Maybe that’s why a good deal of the pimp’s lingo and myth and style permeates hip-hop. This isn’t brand new: Americans have been for generations listening to music, dancing, dressing and talking with expressions that started on the
street. Jazz was first played in bordellos, jitterbugging and zoot suits came up from the underground. Chump
change, a Wall Street expression, originally referred to the kind of money an unsuccessful pimp made.”
“Silky,” a pimp, with his “stars,” New York City. 1970 “Why would a pimp who leeches off women end up as a popular culture hero? The illusion persists that there is some effortless way to make it to Easy Street. And in a world of one-parent families, a man who is getting it over on women may appear enviable. Outlaws can look like heroes to the young and rebellious. Maybe that’s why a good deal of the pimp’s lingo and myth and style permeates hip-hop. This isn’t brand new: Americans have been for generations listening to music, dancing, dressing and talking with expressions that started on the street. Jazz was first played in bordellos, jitterbugging and zoot suits came up from the underground. Chump change, a Wall Street expression, originally referred to the kind of money an unsuccessful pimp made.”
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Married couple, Atlanta, Georgia.  1980


“This happy pair met and married when he was in the U.S. Army stationed in Germany. The husband told me,
‘Had we been married and living here in Georgia 25 years ago, I would’ve been hanging from a lamppost.’”
Married couple, Atlanta, Georgia. 1980 “This happy pair met and married when he was in the U.S. Army stationed in Germany. The husband told me, ‘Had we been married and living here in Georgia 25 years ago, I would’ve been hanging from a lamppost.’”
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Alabama’s Mother Teresa, Pine Apple, Alabama.  1992


“This Mother Teresa is, in fact, Dr. Roseanne Cook, who is also a nun. She sees 30 patients a day at a free clinic then goes to the homes of those with no transport. She offers great care, free medicine, kindness, cheer and sympathy to those who have the least.”
Alabama’s Mother Teresa, Pine Apple, Alabama. 1992 “This Mother Teresa is, in fact, Dr. Roseanne Cook, who is also a nun. She sees 30 patients a day at a free clinic then goes to the homes of those with no transport. She offers great care, free medicine, kindness, cheer and sympathy to those who have the least.”
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Three generations of tenant farmers, Millers Ferry,  Alabama  1976
Three generations of tenant farmers, Millers Ferry, Alabama 1976
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Father and son, Queens, New York City.  1968
Father and son, Queens, New York City. 1968
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Shooting craps, Brooklyn, New York City.  1963
Shooting craps, Brooklyn, New York City. 1963
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Out of work, out of luck, Harlem, New York City.  1968

ÒIn central Harlem at this time, an unemployment rate of one out of every four men was not uncommon. Limited
skills, poor schooling, racism, a downturn in the economy and the employersÕ preference for immigrants over blacks were some of the reasons these men were out of work. Often they squatted in abandoned buildings
and scavenged for survival. Neighbors might give them errands and little jobs to do in exchange for a meal.
Grinding poverty forced many men like these into despair, substance abuse, crime, apathy and rage.Ó
Out of work, out of luck, Harlem, New York City. 1968 ÒIn central Harlem at this time, an unemployment rate of one out of every four men was not uncommon. Limited skills, poor schooling, racism, a downturn in the economy and the employersÕ preference for immigrants over blacks were some of the reasons these men were out of work. Often they squatted in abandoned buildings and scavenged for survival. Neighbors might give them errands and little jobs to do in exchange for a meal. Grinding poverty forced many men like these into despair, substance abuse, crime, apathy and rage.Ó
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Chewing the fat, Brooklyn, New York City.  1963


ÒA good deal of socializing is done on the street. Though
the image above may look like a scene out of a Beckett
play, these cans provide a convenient place to sit and catch up.
Chewing the fat, Brooklyn, New York City. 1963 ÒA good deal of socializing is done on the street. Though the image above may look like a scene out of a Beckett play, these cans provide a convenient place to sit and catch up."
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The Bedford Stuyvesant ghetto,  Brooklyn,  New York City.  1963

As difficult as the Bed Stuy street might look, it was
teeming with life. Twenty years later, I went back and
the neighborhood had fallen apart. All the buildings were
boarded up and deserted.
The Bedford Stuyvesant ghetto, Brooklyn, New York City. 1963 As difficult as the Bed Stuy street might look, it was teeming with life. Twenty years later, I went back and the neighborhood had fallen apart. All the buildings were boarded up and deserted.
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Eartha Holman, a single mother on welfare, lived with her eight children in a three-room, fifth-floor walk-up, Harlem, New York City.  1966
Eartha Holman, a single mother on welfare, lived with her eight children in a three-room, fifth-floor walk-up, Harlem, New York City. 1966
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Kime Holman cutting up as Batman in class, Harlem, New York City.  1966
Kime Holman cutting up as Batman in class, Harlem, New York City. 1966
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Kime clowns around in the gym at Maine Central Institute,  Pittsfield,  Maine.  1972
Kime clowns around in the gym at Maine Central Institute, Pittsfield, Maine. 1972
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Kime playfully snuggles with an old school chum at a basketball game,  New York City.  1981
Kime playfully snuggles with an old school chum at a basketball game, New York City. 1981
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Kime graduates from Boston College,  Boston,  Massachusetts.  1980
Kime graduates from Boston College, Boston, Massachusetts. 1980
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Segregated classroom, Prairie Mission, Alabama. 1966
Segregated classroom, Prairie Mission, Alabama. 1966
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Classroom, New York City.  1968
Classroom, New York City. 1968
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On the National Mall, Washington, D.C.  1968
On the National Mall, Washington, D.C. 1968
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A salute, Brooklyn, New York City.  1963


“When these pictures were taken in the ’60s, racial tensions were mounting, and the Civil Rights Movement was front page news on a daily basis. The boy in the car was up to some mischief he didn’t want me seeing, and this was his response. My street sense told me he was saying, ‘White man, bad enough you put me down. Don’t stare.’”
A salute, Brooklyn, New York City. 1963 “When these pictures were taken in the ’60s, racial tensions were mounting, and the Civil Rights Movement was front page news on a daily basis. The boy in the car was up to some mischief he didn’t want me seeing, and this was his response. My street sense told me he was saying, ‘White man, bad enough you put me down. Don’t stare.’”
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Writing on the wall, Alberta, Alabama.  1966
Writing on the wall, Alberta, Alabama. 1966
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Store,  Sumter,  South Carolina.  1962
Store, Sumter, South Carolina. 1962
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Courthouse,  Clinton,  Louisiana.  1963
Courthouse, Clinton, Louisiana. 1963
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Holding on:  Freedom Riders on Route 40 between Baltimore and Washington,  D.C.  1962

“Gripped by terror, armed with only their ideals, the Freedom Riders were intent on smashing racial barriers yet terrified of the price they might have to pay.”
Holding on: Freedom Riders on Route 40 between Baltimore and Washington, D.C
Holding on: Freedom Riders on Route 40 between Baltimore and Washington, D.C. 1962 “Gripped by terror, armed with only their ideals, the Freedom Riders were intent on smashing racial barriers yet terrified of the price they might have to pay.” Holding on: Freedom Riders on Route 40 between Baltimore and Washington, D.C
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Sign of the times: The dream is written on the frosted window of a Freedom Riders bus, somewhere on the road between New York City and Washington,  D.C.  1962
Sign of the times: The dream is written on the frosted window of a Freedom Riders bus, somewhere on the road between New York City and Washington, D.C. 1962
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Damage control: Congress of Racial Equality volunteers, most of them students, are taught to protect themselves if attacked during a peaceful protest, Columbus, Ohio.  1962
Damage control: Congress of Racial Equality volunteers, most of them students, are taught to protect themselves if attacked during a peaceful protest, Columbus, Ohio. 1962
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The art of war: Militant students learn Gandhi’s approach to non-violent protest, Anniston, Alabama.  1963
The art of war: Militant students learn Gandhi’s approach to non-violent protest, Anniston, Alabama. 1963
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“The owner here has reserved his right to serve whomever he pleases. The presence of a policeman in a situation like this usually meant that instead of having food dumped on you and hot coffee in your lap, you’d be peacefully led to jail.
“The owner here has reserved his right to serve whomever he pleases. The presence of a policeman in a situation like this usually meant that instead of having food dumped on you and hot coffee in your lap, you’d be peacefully led to jail." Sitting in, Cambridge, Maryland. 1962
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Bayard Rustin,  Baltimore,  Maryland.  1962
Bayard Rustin, Baltimore, Maryland. 1962
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Singing in the rain,  Atlantic City, New Jersey. 1964

“Just back from the horrific and heroic Freedom Summer campaign of 1964, where they were attempting to register black voters in the Deep South, students sang and protested outside the Democratic Party National Convention in Atlantic City. They were asking for color-blind voting laws for delegates and voters alike.”
Singing in the rain, Atlantic City, New Jersey. 1964 “Just back from the horrific and heroic Freedom Summer campaign of 1964, where they were attempting to register black voters in the Deep South, students sang and protested outside the Democratic Party National Convention in Atlantic City. They were asking for color-blind voting laws for delegates and voters alike.”
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Chillin’, Washington, D.C.  1962

“The singing in Washington came at the end of a long day of demonstrations.  It was a way to unwind.”
Chillin’, Washington, D.C. 1962 “The singing in Washington came at the end of a long day of demonstrations. It was a way to unwind.”
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Hate speech, the White House, Washington, D.C.  1962
Hate speech, the White House, Washington, D.C. 1962
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Joining the flock, West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana. 1963

“In West Feliciana, an overwhelmingly black parish where no person of color had voted in the twentieth century, volunteer Mimi Feingold urged members of a church congregation to try to vote. She then joined hands with them to sing, ‘This Little Light of Mine.
Joining the flock, West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana. 1963 “In West Feliciana, an overwhelmingly black parish where no person of color had voted in the twentieth century, volunteer Mimi Feingold urged members of a church congregation to try to vote. She then joined hands with them to sing, ‘This Little Light of Mine."
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Passive resister,  Brooklyn,  New York City.  1964
Passive resister, Brooklyn, New York City. 1964
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Safety first: Parents and children respond to a wave of accidents by blocking their street and demanding the installation of a traffic light,  Brooklyn,  New York City.
 1962
Safety first: Parents and children respond to a wave of accidents by blocking their street and demanding the installation of a traffic light, Brooklyn, New York City. 1962
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We shall not be moved, Brooklyn, New York City. 1962
We shall not be moved, Brooklyn, New York City. 1962
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